Diary Entries of Malinda Barge Ray 1861-1865

By: FACVB

This transcript of Malinda Ray’s diary of the Civil War period was done by the staff of the Museum of the Cape Fear, working from both a handwritten copy by Mrs. Susan Tillinghast and a typewritten transcript by Miss Mary Coit Tillinghast.

Valentines Day Ideas

By: FACVB

Although Valentines Day celebrations can include tradition romantic things like flowers and chocolate – it doesn’t have to!  Hare a couple of non-traditional ideas for celebrate Valentine’s Day in Cumberland County.

The Pavilion at Carvers Creek State Park

By: FACVB

pavilionThe January edition of Carvers Creek State Park’s newsletter highlighted the history of one of the structures at the park. The article is reprinted here with permission.

The Pavilion at Carvers Creek state park is the only standing remains of a nineteenth-century sawmill in Cumberland County.

Black History Month In Fort Bragg and the Communities of Cumberland County

By: FACVB

Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history.

Throughout February, special arts, cultural and history events in Fort Bragg and the Communities of Cumberland County honor the contributions of African-Americans to the region, state and the nation. Here’s a snapshot of some events:

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SHERMAN IN FAYETTEVILLE – (First Hand Account of General Sherman’s Occupation of Fayetteville in March 1865)

By: FACVB

1855-Fayetteville-ArsenalSHERMAN IN FAYETTEVILLE   Undated Letter (c.1890-1900)

from    Miss Sarah Ann Tillinghast  (1837-1909)
to  Miss Mary Elizabeth Tillinghast  (1875-1976)

This blog entry is a line-by-line transcript of a letter Miss Sarah Ann Tillinghast wrote to Miss Mary Elizabeth Tillinghast.  The topic of the letter is life during General Sherman’s occupation of Fayetteville in March 1865.  Tillinghasts were a prominent family in Fayetteville in the Civil War Period.  The letter is provided by the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex.